COVID-19 Vaccine Information, Benefits, and How it Works

COVID-19 Vaccines Have Arrived: What You Need to Know

We have three documents with more information on the COVID-19 Vaccine from the Saginaw County Health Department. You can download them now or read more below.

benefits of the covid-19 vaccinationHow the COVID-19 vaccination works in the body 10 things you should know about vaccine development

 

The Benefits of the COVID-19 Vaccine

What are the benefits of the covid-19 vaccine

  1. COVID-19 vaccination will help keep you from getting COVID-19:
  2. COVID-19 vaccination will be a safer way to help build protection
  3. COVID-19 vaccination will be an important tool to help stop the pandemic

Read all of the details on the benefits of the vaccine.

How the COVID-19 Vaccination Works in the Body

how does the covid-19 vaccination work in the body?

 

Many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies to trigger our immune systems. That’s NOT the case for most of the COVID-19 vaccines that are likely to be authorized for use in the United States.

You should know:

  1. mRNA vaccines do NOT use the live virus that causes COVID-19!
  2. They do not affect or interact with our DNA in any way.
  3. mRNA never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our genetic material is keps
  4. The cell breaks down and gets rid of the mRNA soon after it is finished using the instructions.

Find out more information on how the vaccine works in your body.

10 Things You Should Know About Vaccine Development

10 things to know about vaccine development

Consistent with our guidance throughout the pandemic, the COVID-19 vaccination is not something we can say is 100% effective nor 100% without risk. But it is an extremely promising tool in the fight against COVID-19 because it provides immunity to large portions of our community, which will reduce the spread significantly. Like everything, the vaccine is something you need to learn more about from trusted sources so you can make an informed, personal choice.
There’s much we still don’t know about the COVID-19 vaccine. But, there are significant developments and findings that you should be aware of as we await delivery and distribution.

Find out the 10 things you need to know about how vaccines are developed.

Get even more information on COVID-19 and related resources on the State of Michigan’s Website.

“We want all Michiganders to get the facts about this safe and effective vaccine and the steps that were taken to develop it,” said Dr. Joneigh Khaldun, chief medical executive and chief deputy for health. “I am grateful and proud to have gotten both doses of my vaccine and I urge Michiganders to make and plan and get vaccinated when it is their turn. This is the way forward out of the pandemic and our chance to return to a sense of normalcy.”

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FREE drive-in flu vaccines now offered at our Saginaw & Bay City COVID-19 Testing Sites

Effective January 4, 2021, the Saginaw COVID-19 drive-thru testing site located 1417 Cumberland is moving back to the old location of 501 Lapeer Ave. at the David R. Gamez health center. Hours: Mon, Tues, Thurs., Fri – 9:00a.m. – 1:00pm & Wed – 7:30am – 1:00pm. Drive-thru hotline (989) 293-3492. Have your ID and insurance card in hand and ready for staff when you arrive. If you do not have insurance you can still be tested.

 

Download this flyer.

 

 

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COVID-19 Guidance: Know the Facts

Isolation vs Quarantine: What’s the Difference?

What is ISOLATION?

At least 10 days of staying home
and away from others
WHEN YOU’RE POSITIVE FOR COVID-19

  • Stay home except for medical care.
  • Isolate yourself from others in your household if possible (it impacts their quarantine time)
  • Notify your healthcare provider ASAP (they don’t always received test results).
  • Let your employer or school know you have COVID-19.
  • You may not get a call from the health department, so fill out the Saginaw County Health Department self-reporting form
  • Notify close contacts so they can start to quarantine themselves.
  • Only resume normal activities when the following have happened:
    • 10 days have passed since symptoms start or when you got tested if asymptomatic
    • Fever free for 24 hours
    • Symptoms improve

What is QUARANTINE?

Staying home and away
from others for 14 days
AFTER EXPOSURE TO COVID-19

  • Determine when you last came into close contact (within 6 feet for 15 minutes) with COVID+ person when they were contagious (anywhere from 48 hours before their symptoms developed or their test came back positive through their isolation period)
  • Quarantine 14 days since that last contact.
  • If the contact is with someone in your household who hasn’t isolated from you, your quarantine will be 24 days – the 10 days of their isolation and the following 14 days.
  • Monitor yourself for symptoms and consider testing.
  • DO NOT use a negative test result to get out of quarantine.
  • Stay home through the 14th day to make sure you don’t develop COVID-19 at any time during its incubation period and spread it to others.

COVID-19 Positive or Exposed: When can I be around others again?

Scenario 1: Close Contact and Quarantine

Sasha’s partner gets sick on Monday and isolates in a separate room. Sasha feels well, but she was in close contact with her partner until Monday so she needs to quarantine for 14 days.

Sasha never has symptoms. Quarantine ends after day 14.

 

COVID-19: Scenario 1

Scenario 2: Isolation with Lingering Symptoms

Alberto gets sick on Wednesday and has a fever and cough for ten days. He cannot end isolation until it’s been ten days and he’s fever-free for 24 hours.

Aleberto isolates the ten days plus one extra day.

 

COVID-19: Scenario 2

Scenario 3: Isolation with Brief Illness

Bill gets sick on Thursday. He feels better and his fever ends on Monday. Even though he seems well earlier, he still must isolate for a full ten days since his symptoms started.

Bill’s isolation ends after ten days.

 

COVID-19: Scenario 3

Scenario 4: Asymptomatic Case

Amy’s co-worker tested positive for COVID-19. Amy began to quarantine and decided to get tested after 5 days even
though she never felt sick. Her test comes back positive. The positive test starts isolation since Amy is asymptomatic.

The positive test result starts isolation since Amy is asymptomatic.

 

COVID-19: Scenario 4

Scenario 5: Household Quarantine and Isolation

Tom’s son, Jake, was exposed at school. Jake quarantines for 4 days and gets sick. Now, Jake isolates and Tom quarantines. Tom cares for Jake. He is exposed until Jake’s isolation ends.

Tom’s quarantine starts as soon as Jake gets sick, but the 14 day count starts after Tom’s last exposure to Jake.

 

COVID-19: Scenario 5

Source:

Saginaw County Health Department
1600 N. Michigan Avenue
Saginaw, MI 48602
Phone: 989.758.3828

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We All Have a Roll in Limiting the Spread of COVID-19: Help Flatten the Curve

COVID-19 Alert November 16, 2020

COVID-19 is spreading in the Great Lakes Bay Region

Along with local hospitals and health departments, we are urging you to recognize that we all have a role in limiting the spread of COVID-19 and need to help flatten the curve.

Please treat this virus seriously and take the necessary steps to keep yourself, those around you and our community healthy. 

Please that the following actions:

COVID-19 Education symbols
  • Wear a face covering
  • Maintain social distancing of 6 feet
  • Avoid gatherings
  • Limit holiday activities to immediate family
  • Monitor your health daily for symptoms of COVID-19
  • Maintain routine healthcare requirements
  • Wash your hands with soap and water
  • Avoid touching your face
  • Clean and disinfect frequently used surfaces

Experiencing symptoms of COVID-19?

Symptoms of COVID-19
  • Contact your primary physician or seek testing
  • Quarantine for 10 days and until symptoms subside

Stay up to date on COVID-19:

Stay up to date on COVID-19 news

Please seek medical attention Please seek medical attention if you have symptoms of heart attack, stroke, or any condition which requires emergency care, including issues pertaining depression.

 

Great Lakes Bay Region and Michigan Health Improvement Alliance

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